slam skiing speed figure hockey bobsled luge curling biathlon canoe SLAM!  NAGANO
SLAM! Nagano SLAM! Nagano Events SLAM! Nagano Schedules SLAM! Nagano Columnists SLAM! Nagano Photo Gallery SLAM! Nagano Team Canada SLAM! Nagano History SLAM! Nagano Medals SLAM! Nagano Results SLAM! Nagano News  LINEUP
biathlon bobsled curling figskating hockey_women hockey_men luge nordiccombined skialpine skifree skijump skixcountry speedskate shorttrack snowboard SLAM!  NAGANO


ALSO ON SLAM!
  • Hockey
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Football


    CANOE SLAM! Sports Jam! Showbiz CNEWS Money ALSO ON CANOE
  • HELP
  • SEARCH

  • CANOE NAGANO '98 ISP DIRECTORY

  • canada sked medal results SLAM!  NAGANO

    Friday, February 13, 1998

    Norway's Vik silences the Japanese

  • Results

     HAKUBA, Japan (AP) -- The fans came by the thousands hoping for a long-awaited Japanese ski jump triumph. They wound up amazed by a monster leap by a Norwegian.
     Bjarte Engen Vik silenced the cheers of the crowd of some 35,000 with a jump of 94.5 meters to take the halfway lead in the Nordic combined Friday (Thursday night EST).
     That leap dwarfed the best jump in Wednesday's individual 90-meter competition off the same hill by three meters and knocked a Japanese jumper out of first place.
     "The result is better than I hoped for in dreams," Vik said. "I knew I could do well in the jumps, but to win the jumping here is very good."
     Jumping next to last after Tsugiharu Ogiwara and Junichi Kogawa had put Japan in the first two positions, Vik came up with the biggest leap of the day for a competition total of 241 points going into Saturday's cross country race.
     With the sun sending temperatures soaring up to 56 degrees, compared with near-freezing on Wednesday, conditions were ideal for longer jumping. Five jumps beat Wednesday's best of 91.5 in the individual event in which another Japanese star, Kazuyoshi Funaki, finished second to Finland's Jani Soininen before a huge holiday crowd.
     Vik's 94.5 gave the World Cup leader a 36-second advantage going into the 15-kilometer cross-country race Saturday (Friday night EST), which will decide the medals. Because Vik is also strong on the trail, he is well placed to win the gold medal four years after finishing third behind teammate Fred Borre Lundberg in Lillehammer.
     Russia's Valery Stolyarov had the best jump of the first round, 92.5 meters, and was last to go in Round 2. He also moved ahead of the Japanese pair. His second-round leap was only 89.5 but it was enough to give him 235 points for second place.
     Kogawa, in sixth place after a first-round 87 meters, took the lead with a leap of 91 in the second, and the fans at the bottom of the hill roared their approval as a score of 232 went up.
     Going next, Ogiwara had them cheering again with a leap of 91.5, which gained him 232.5 to take first place.
     But instead of going into Saturday's race first and second, the two Japanese will be third and fourth.
     Ogiwara, whose twin brother, Kenji, is world champion, hoped he could make up the difference.
     "I hink I'm going to run well if the weather is fine tomorrow," he said.
     "I thought I would be nervous because of the supporters' cheering," Ogiwara said after his two jumps. "But I actually felt relaxed when I started."
     Austria's Christoph Bieler bettered them both on distance with 93 meters but poor style points put him back, while Germany's Jens Deimel, starting third in Round 2, managed only 87 meters and dropped back to 10th.
     Kenji Ogiwara, who placed fourth in Lillehammer after going into the event the overwhelming favorite to win the gold, placed ninth with leaps of 85.5 and 90 meters for 226 points, and will have a 1:30 deficit on Vik to make up.
     Lundberg, the defending champion, wound up 22nd after modest jumps of 83 and 84.5 meters gave him 205 points. With 3:36 to make up on Vik, he is out of the medals this time.
     The leading American was Todd Lodwick, of Steamboat Springs, Colo., who placed 13th with jumps of 82.5 and 89 meters. With 217 points, he has 2:24 to catch Vik in the cross country.
     Bill Demong, a 17-year-old from Saranac Lake, N.Y., was eighth after a first-round jump of 87.5. But he came up with only 82 in the second round and slipped down to 19th with 208.5 points and 3:15 to make up on the leader.

    Results

     HAKUBA, Japan (AP) -- Results Friday after the jump portion of the nordic combined event at the Winter Olympics (time behind, first jump and second jump in parentheses):
     1, Bjarte Vik, Norway (0:00, 116.0, 125.0), 241.0.
     2, Valery Stoliarov, Russia (0:36, 120.0, 115.0), 235.0.
     3, Tsugiharu Ogiwara, Japan (0:51, 112.5, 120.0), 232.5.
     4, Junichi Kogawa, Japan (0:54, 112.0, 120.0), 232.0.
     5, Christoph Bieler, Austria (1:00, 112.5, 118.5), 231.0.
     6, Samppa Lajunen, Finland (1:03, 108.5, 122.0), 230.5.
     7, Mario Stecher, Austria (1:15, 106.0, 122.5), 228.5.
     8, Milan Kucera, Czech Republic (1:18, 110.5, 117.5), 228.0.
     9, Kenji Ogiwara, Japan (1:30, 107.5, 118.5), 226.0.
     10, Jens Deimel, Germany (2:00, 113.5, 107.5), 221.0.
     11, Nicolas Bal, France (2:15, 110.0, 108.5), 218.5.
     12, Jan Matura, Czech Republic (2:18, 104.5, 113.5), 218.0.
     13, Todd Lodwick, Steamboat Springs, Colo. (2:24, 101.0, 116.0), 217.0.
     14, Tapio Nurmela, Finland (2:45, 110.5, 103.0), 213.5.
     15, Dmitrij Sinitzyn, Russia (2:45, 110.5, 103.0), 213.5.
     16, Sylvain Guillaume, France (2:51, 108.0, 104.5), 212.5.
     17, Jari Mantila, Finland (2:54, 101.0, 111.0), 212.0.
     18, Ronny Ackermann, Germany (3:09, 103.5, 106.0), 209.5.
     19, Bill Demong, Saranac Lake, N.Y. (3:15, 110.5, 98.0), 208.5.
     20, Hannu Manninen, Finland (3:24, 101.5, 105.5), 207.0.
     21, Jean-Yves Cuendet, Switzerland (3:30, 105.5, 100.5), 206.0.
     22, Fred Lundberg, Norway (3:36, 101.5, 103.5), 205.0.
     23, Ladislav Rygl, Czech Republic (3:39, 96.0, 108.5), 204.5.
     24, Jens Salumae, Estonia (3:45, 102.5, 101.0), 203.5.
     25, Kristian Hammer, Norway (3:45, 105.5, 98.0), 203.5.
     26, Josef Buchner, Germany (3:48, 99.5, 103.5), 203.0.
     27, Ludovic Roux, France (3:51, 98.0, 104.5), 202.5.
     28, Fabrice Guy, France (3:57, 98.0, 103.5), 201.5.
     29, Christoph Eugen, Austria (4:09, 98.0, 101.5), 199.5.
     30, Andrea Longo, Italy (4:12, 111.0, 88.0), 199.0.
     31, Denis Tishagin, Russia (4:15, 98.0, 100.5), 198.5.
     32, Urs Kunz, Switzerland (4:30, 102.0, 94.0), 196.0.
     33, Alexei Fadeov, Russia (4:33, 107.5, 88.0), 195.5.
     34, Petr Smejc, Czech Republic (4:36, 103.0, 92.0), 195.0.
     35, Dave Jarrett, Steamboat Springs, Colo. (4:36, 105.5, 89.5), 195.0.
     36, Satoshi Mori, Japan (4:36, 105.5, 89.5), 195.0.
     37, Magnar Freimuth, Estonia (4:39, 95.5, 99.0), 194.5.
     38, Andi Hartmann, Switzerland (4:48, 90.0, 103.0), 193.0.
     39, Tim Tetreault, Norwich, Vt. (5:03, 94.0, 96.5), 190.5.
     40, Felix Gottwald, Austria (5:06, 98.5, 91.5), 190.0.
     41, Matthias Looss, Germany (5:24, 83.0, 104.0), 187.0.
     42, Halldor Skard, Norway (5:30, 75.5, 110.5), 186.0.
     43, Marco Zarucchi, Switzerland (5:33, 99.0, 86.5), 185.5.
     44, Ago Markvardt, Estonia (5:57, 77.5, 104.0), 181.5.
     45, Konstantin Kalinovsky, Belarus (6:00, 85.5, 95.5), 181.0.
     46, Roman Perko, Slovenia (6:06, 92.5, 87.5), 180.0.
     47, Tambet Pikkor, Estonia (7:33, 77.0, 88.5), 165.5.
     48, Sergei Zacharenko, Belarus (8:18, 73.0, 85.0), 158.0.