CANOE SLAM! HOCKEY SLAM! FOOTBALL SLAM! BASEBALL SLAM! BASKETBALL SLAM! SKATING SLAM! SKIING SLAM! SPORT-BY-SPORT SLAM! SPORTS SLAM! GLOBAL NAVIGATION
SLAM! Figure Skating


SLAM! Sports
SLAM! Skating
SLAM! Stojko


COLUMNS
  • Homepage

    REVIEW
  • World Championships
  • '99 Skate Canada
  • '99 Cdn. Champ.
  • '98 Cdn. Champ.
  • '97 Cdn. Champ.
  • '98 Winter Olympics

    INTERACTIVE
  • LIVE! Scoreboard
  • Photo Gallery
  • Sports Talks

    ALSO ON SLAM!

    CHRONO SPORTS

  • Tuesday, March 31, 1998

    Goebel made history

     MINNEAPOLIS (AP) -- Timothy Goebel found out Tuesday he had made U.S. skating history last month.
     Goebel thought he'd landed the first quadruple jump by an American when he won the Junior Series Final at Lausanne, Switzerland, March 8. The jump, a quad salchow in combination with a double toe loop, was not ratified until this week, when International Skating Union officials saw a tape provided by the parents of the U.S. pairs team Tiffany and Johnnie Stiegler.
     Sally Stapleford, chairperson of the ISU technical committee, confirmed the validity of the jump after viewing the tape.
     "It was clean," Stapleford said. "It was not the best quality landing. He was slightly leaned forward, but it was clean."
     Goebel beat Michael Weiss and Todd Eldredge as the first American to land the four-revolution jump. Weiss came extremely close at the 1997 nationals, but barely scraped his second foot on the ice. It wasn't until U.S. Figure Skating Association officials watched an ABC-TV videotape after the event ended that Weiss' effort was disallowed.
     Weiss also just missed landing the quad at this year's national championships, while Eldredge fell on his attempt.
     "It's a huge relief," Goebel, 17 of Rolling Meadows, Ill., said. "The men do their long program in three days (at the World Championships) and with my luck, they both would have landed it."
     Goebel also is the first skater from any nation to land a quad salchow. Every other recognized quad has been a toe loop.
     "I knew Timmy had done it," his coach, Carol Heiss Jenkins, said. "Tim knew he had done it. It's just nice to get credit."
     While the quad has become a staple in the repertoires of most top-level men, Americans have struggled with it. Weiss is the first U.S. skater to consistently attempt it.
     Goebel hoped to land the quad at January's nationals in Philadelphia. But hewithdrew there with a hip injury.
     He nailed a perfect quad in his warmup for the free skate at Lausanne. After hitting the jump during the program, he moved up from fourth place to win.
     "I was thrilled," he said of the quad. "After that, I could have skated forever."
     



    SLAM! Sports   Search   Help   CANOE