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  • CANOE NAGANO '98 ISP DIRECTORY

  • canada sked medal results SLAM!  NAGANO

    Wednesday, February 18, 1998

    Finns lead after defending titlist Japan falls to fifth

     HAKUBA, Japan (AP) — The Olympic ski-jumping venue, site of one of Japan’s great moments at the Nagano Games, was mostly silent this time. There wasn’t much cause for horn-blowing or wild cheering.
     Two days after 50,000 fans saw Japan win the gold medal in 120-meter team jumping, the host nation struggled with its jumps in the Nordic combined team event.
     As a result, two-time defending champion Japan was fifth Thursday (Wednesday night EST) heading into the cross-country portion.
     “The Japanese team did not make any grave mistakes,” said team member Gen Tomii, “so we’re still in with a chance of a medal.”
     It will be a difficult task. Japan will start the cross-country race 21 seconds behind the leader, Finland. Austria is in second place, four seconds behind Finland, followed by Norway (8 seconds) and the Czech Republic.
     Considered stronger at the ski jump than in cross country, the Japanese just didn’t produce.
     While individual world champion Kenji Ogiwara had leaps of 89 and 86 meters on the 90-meter hill at Hakuba, Finland’s Samppa Lajunen came up with 94.5 in the second round to give his team the lead.
     “I was waiting for a good head wind, wanted to make a big jump, hoping to go about 95 meters but I got too worked up,” Kenji Ogiwara said about his second-round leap. “I didn’t have a good telemark and it was not a good jump.”
     Norway’s lineup will have the Combined’s individual gold medalist here, Bjate Engen Vik, who came up with impressive leaps of 94.5 and 95.5 but didn’t get much help from his teammates.
     “Before today, we were hoping for a mdal. Not we’re looking for the gold,” said Finland’s Samppa Lajunen, silver medalist in the individual event. “The Norwegians got some fortunate wind, but this luck could be washed away by tomorrow’s expected rain.”
     The Finns believe rainy conditions on a short course could hamper the Norwegians.
     The Japanese, each with a Japanese flag painted on his face, thrilled the crowd of 35,000 with some solid jumping in the opening round.
     Satoshi Mori leaped 90.5 meters, Tomii reached 87.5, Tsugiharu Ogiwara scored 89.5 and his twin brother, world champion Kenji Ogiwara, jumped 89.
     The foursome led until Vik, last to jump, produced a carbon copy of the leap that effectively won him the individual title — a 94.5 meter monster that also moved Norway from fourth to first at the end of round one.
     Austria’s Mario Stecher produced a leap of 96.5 meters at the start of round two to send his team temporarily to the top, and Japan slipped to fifth after Mori’s leap 11 meters shorter.
     Austria stayed ahead of Finland, but Norway slipped to sixth after a leap of only 77.5 by Kenneth Braaten, who had managed 90 in the opening round.
     Coming into the final series of jumps, Kenji Ogiwara needed something big to put Japan back into medal contention. Although cheered on by the crowd, he came up with only 86 meters and the cheers turned to groans.
     While Christoph Eugen stretched to 90 meters with his final leap for Austria, Lajunen’s big leap sent the Finns soaring into the lead.
     The United States finished the jumping in ninth place, with 2 minutes, 45 seconds to make up on the leader Friday.

     Nordic Combined Results
     HAKUBA, Japan (AP) -- Expanded results Thursday after the ski jump portion of the nordic combined team event at the Winter Olympics:

     1, Finland (Jari Mantila; Hannu Manninen; Tapio Nurmela; Samppa Lajunen), 226.5.
     1, Jari Mantila (112.5, 119.0), 231.5
     2, Hannu Manninen (113.0, 116.0), 229.0
     3, Tapio Nurmela (103.0, 107.5), 210.5
     4, Samppa Lajunen (109.0, 126.0), 235.0
     2, Austria (Mario Stecher; Christoph Bieler; Felix Gottwald; Christoph Eugen), (0:04), 225.9.
     1, Mario Stecher (117.5, 131.0), 248.5
     2, Christoph Bieler (117.5, 105.5), 223.0
     3, Felix Gottwald (102.5, 113.5), 216.0
     4, Christoph Eugen (100.5, 115.5), 216.0
     3, Norway (Fred B. Lundberg; Kenneth Braaten; Halldor J. Skard; Bjarte E. Vik), (0:08), 225.3.
     1, Fred B. Lundberg (109.5, 110.0), 219.5
     2, Kenneth Braaten (116.5, 87.5), 204.0
     3, Halldor J. Skard (110.0, 112.5), 222.5
     4, Bjarte E. Vik (126.0, 129.0), 255.0
     4, Czech Republic (Marek Fiurasek; Ladislav Rygl; Jan Matura; Milan Kucera), (0:09), 225.1.
     1, Marek Fiurasek (97.5, 93.0), 190.5
     2, Ladislav Rygl (120.0, 107.0), 227.0
     3, Jan Matura (119.0, 123.0), 242.0
     4, Milan Kucera (121.0, 120.0), 241.0
     5, Japan (Satoshi Mori; Gen Tomii; Tsugiharu Ogiwara; Kenji Ogiwara), (0:21), 223.3.
     1, Satoshi Mori (117.0, 106.5), 223.5
     2, Gen Tomii (111.5, 105.5), 217.0
     3, Tsugiharu Ogiwara (116.0, 113.5), 229.5
     4, Kenji Ogiwara (115.0, 108.0), 223.0
     6, France (Fabrice Guy; Nicolas Bal; Ludovic Roux; Sylvain Guillaume), (1:11), 215.8.
     1, Fabrice Guy (106.5, 100.0), 206.5
     2, Nicolas Bal (106.0, 106.0), 212.0
     3, Ludovic Roux (108.5, 110.0), 218.5
     4, Sylvain Guillaume (109.0, 117.0), 226.0
     7, Germany (Jens Deimel; Matthias Looss; Thorsten Schmitt; Ronny Ackermann), (1:15), 215.3.
     1, Jens Deimel (115.5, 118.5), 234.0
     2, Matthias Looss (107.5, 100.5), 208.0
     3, Thorsten Schmitt (101.0, 109.0), 210.0
     4, Ronny Ackermann (105.0, 104.0), 209.0
     8, Russia (Alexei Fadeov; Vladimir Lyssenin; Dmitrij Sinitzyn; Valery Stoliarov), (2:13), 206.5.
     1, Alexei Fadeov (104.5, 101.0), 205.5
     2, Vladimir Lyssenin (68.5, 96.5), 165.0
     3, Dmitrij Sinitzyn (118.0, 106.5), 224.5
     4, Valery Stoliarov (112.0, 119.0), 231.0
     9, United States (Bill Demong, Saranac Lake, N.Y.; Tim Tetreault, Norwich, Vt.; Dave Jarrett, Steamboat Springs, Colo.; Todd Lodwick, Steamboat Springs, Colo.), (2:45), 201.8.
     1, Bill Demong (79.0, 96.5), 175.5
     2, Tim Tetreault (102.0, 95.0), 197.0
     3, Dave Jarrett (104.0, 101.0), 205.0
     4, Todd Lodwick (119.0, 110.5), 229.5
     10, Switzerland (Marco Zarucchi; Jean-Yves Cuendet; Urs Kunz; Andi Hartmann), (3:01), 199.3.
     1, Marco Zarucchi (97.0, 92.0), 189.0
     2, Jean-Yves Cuendet (100.5, 93.0), 193.5
     3, Urs Kunz (89.0, 95.0), 184.0
     4, Andi Hartmann (116.0, 114.5), 230.5
     11, Estonia (Tambet Pikkor; Ago Markvardt; Jens Salumae; Magnar Freimuth), (4:21), 187.4.
     1, Tambet Pikkor (90.0, 94.0), 184.0
     2, Ago Markvardt (84.0, 92.0), 176.0
     3, Jens Salumae (108.5, 101.0), 209.5
     4, Magnar Freimuth (88.0, 92.0), 180.0