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  • Tuesday, March 23, 1999

    Bourne, Kraatz in second place

    By NEIL STEVENS -- The Canadian Press
     HELSINKI (CP) -- Shae-Lynn Bourne and Victor Kraatz were placed second by the judges of the first compulsory ice dance at the world figure skating championships today.
     It was an encouraging boost for Canada's champions. They've won the bronze medals for the last three years, and to move up this year they needed to start with a gain in the compulsories.
     Defending world champions Angelika Krylova and Oleg Ovsyannikov of Russia were first. Marina Anissina and Gwendal Peizerat of France, the silver medallists last year, were dropped to third today.
     "We're really happy with the way we're skating," said Kraatz. "It's very encouraging.
     "It's really important for us to be in this spot after the first compulsory simply because it sets us up really well for the short program (Thursday)."
     "Our compulsories have felt strong all season," said Bourne.
     She tore the miniscus cartilage in her left knee last December and the team physiotherapist massages the damaged joint after each session on the ice.
     "Shae-Lynn is skating in a lot of pain, but she's getting through it," said Kraatz.
     "It's not going to get better until I have a scope done," Bourne said.
     A lot can happen yet, but this was the great start for which they were hoping.
     Canada's No. 2 ice dancers, Chantal Lefebvre and Michel Brunet, were placed 15th in the first compulsory. They finished 19th overall last year.
     Brunet's expression was of supressed anger as he watched technical marks of 4.5, 4.6, 4.7, 4.7, 4.3, 4.8, and 4.4 of the possible 6.0 appear on the scoreboard. He declined comment as he headed to the dressing room to switch his concentration to the second compulsory soon to follow.
     
     



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