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  • Friday, March 26, 1999

    It's not the movement Canuck duo hoped for

    By STEVE BUFFERY -- Toronto Sun
      HELSINKI, Finland -- The earth moved at the world figure skating championships -- not an earthquake, something even more uncommon.
     There was actual movement in the ice dance standings after the original dance.
     Ice dancing has taken numerous hits over the years as a result of judges scoring the top teams in the exact order, from the start of the first compulsory right through to the free dance.
     This year, after much criticism and some rule changes, there finally appears to be some objectivity.
     Yesterday, the French team of Marina Anissina and Gwendal Peizerat moved past defending world champions Anjelika Krylova and Oleg Ovsyannikov after the original -- the first time they have been ahead of the Russians.
     Canadians Shae-Lynn Bourne and Victor Kraatz were third, a bit of a disappointment given they were tied for second with the French after the two compulsories.
     As usual, the Canadians didn't mince words in saying they deserved better.
     "I think if you take this year's program and play last year's music, you're not going to get the same program," Kraatz said of the couple's new original dance, skated to the romantic Irish ballad Seachran. "And I think if you take some of the (other) skaters and you play their old (program) and you were to take the exact same music, it's the same program. Same style, nothing has changed."
     The Canadians, third at the past three worlds, dismissed the notion they consistently lose marks for presentation because they are unable to convey the same passion or romance as the Russians and French, who seem to spend as much time training at the Actor's Studio as they do at the rink.
     "What we have is real," Kraatz, 27, said. "We're not putting on an act."
     Bourne, 23, suggested that their waltz, the appointed program this season for the original, is more true to form than the theatrics of the two top teams.
     "I think what we showed out there was something very romantic. I wouldn't call it aggressive, but to me a waltz isn't aggressive. It's romantic and it's soft and it's lilting. And that's the style we took."
     "We want every man to want to be skating with me," said Bourne, a native of Chatham, Ont. "And every woman to want to be skating with Victor. Something natural, something everybody dreams of."
     The free dance will be held today.


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